By July 20, 2010 Read More →

3 Take Aways from Conversations with God

3 Take Aways from Conversations with God

I don’t know if you’ve read Conversations with God : An Uncommon Dialogue (Book 1) , but it’s *interesting.*

My three take aways are:

  1. We’re here for experiences and creating.
  2. A cutting question is – “Does it serve you … in terms of who you are and who you choose to be?
  3. Everything that you think, say, and do is a reflection of what you’ve decided about yourself, a statement of who you are, an act of creating your destiny and who you want to be.

I liked the reminder to create what I want to experience – and that it’s not about learning (in terms of facts and figures) – it’s about growth … take on the experiences where I grow and follow the growth … and create experiences that I’ll enjoy.

Photo by Caitlinator.

16 Comments on "3 Take Aways from Conversations with God"

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  1. Jenn says:

    JD,
    I love the idea of “creating what I enjoy, as you shared.”

    This series of books are actually one of my hubby’s favorites. He has had them since his younger years.
    **In conversing with God it truly focuses on the natural flow – the intimate reality, and everything can be a ripple of that. I have read some of his works and I like how he shares these simple yet meaningful dialogues. I think he makes a great parallel to some of Marianne Williamson’s prayers in Illuminata.

    I agree that it is quite normal to create, and it is actually dangerous at times to think that it is not, or that some person/s are omitted from this play. Art has so many forms, and we all resonate with unique passages and expressions. I believe this was intended to add to our intimacy with our Maker. As we align with those heart-focused creations, we feel most of who we are coming thru more clearly and it is authentic alignment to our Source.

    I also like this line:
    “Everything that you think, say, and do is a reflection of what you’ve decided about yourself, a statement of who you are, an act of creating your destiny and who you want to be.”

    Personally, I don’t see how this cannot serve us if we desire to be authentic. It requires loyalty, and commitment to respond to our heart’s innermost desires.

    thanks for sharing your thoughts on this today.
    xx
    Jenn

  2. Patricia says:

    JD
    I have read all three of the Conversations with God books and I think your take away are just right on the mark. I did not get much more out of the second and third books.

    The other thing I really liked about the books was that I was able to pass around my copies to others for them to read, and now several years later I am still getting calls from people who are enjoying the read – even folks I do not know – one copy is traveling far and wide like the travel agencies gnome!

    I think too, book 1 was an easier read than Frankel’s Man’s Search for Meaning – so more people would connect to it.

    Thank you

  3. Sandra Lee says:

    Hi J.D. You are so prolific these days, it’s fabulous! I haven’t read this book myself, however, I agree we are always creating either consciously or unconsciously. You certainly elucidate the path of creating consciously. All the best to you.

  4. JD says:

    @ Jenn — I like how it’s simple but effective as a reminder to focus on creating the life you want to lead.

    @ Patricia — The book is an easy read — I think I read it end-to-end on Christmas day on my Kindle. I liked the style and flow.

    @ Sandra — Thank you. I’m a fan of using an author metaphor, writing our path forward, a story at a time.

  5. Farnoosh says:

    I read this book as a young teenager and loved it…..
    It left a nice impression on me – and I found it far from a religious book. It was a refreshing take on God. I really enjoyed reading it….And I took tons of notes….

  6. Whoa! Great thoughts today. Just beautiful. Thanks.

    We really do choose what experiences we create at any given moment. And perception .

    And a bit off-topic… alas, your sidebar link button went into storage on my site today. But after 21 new “Friends Of The Day” buttons have rotated through, yours will magically reappear in a re-cap post! Whoo-hoo! :)

    xo

  7. Hilary says:

    Hi JD .. I haven’t come across these books, but will now keep an eye open for them .. how right you are .. that we alone can decide what we do and create our own life for the situation we’re in .. certainly I appreciate this at the moment (and moments we have together)when I’m with my mother .. it is the positiveness of each and every visit for me, my mother, other relatives and residents, and the staff – to gain the maximum I can through this time. I did the same with my uncle .. and at the beginning it was taking the focus of me and on to others, then realising that I needed to look after me too .. and to grow in my spiritual self: definitely a work in progress.

    Does it serve me .. no – but yes .. it is something that I would not not do for my mother or uncle, and therefore I needed to adjust my own life and find a new path forward – be brave through these times of change and learn as I grow.

    Thanks – interesting for me at this time .. Hilary

  8. JD says:

    @ Farnoosh — I ended up taking a bunch of notes too. I was surprised. Some “scenes” in the book were very inspirational and insightful.

    @ Jannie — Life really is a bunch of journeys where we get to be the main character and the bard at the same time … or whatever else we want to be.

    @ Hilary — It sounds like you’r going through tremendous growth and creating a ton of experiences. While we can’t always choose our situations, we can choose our experiences for those situations.

  9. JD –

    Simple and powerful reminders. No doubt our life is simply made up of an endless series of moments. It is how we think and act in every moment that shapes our experience. if we take responsibility for that and live to our values, then we paint the life we’d like.

    Great post,

    Phil

  10. JD says:

    @ Phil — Thank you. I still get surprised how much of a difference it makes. Just asking who do I want to be when I choose a response helps me do a quick check and a possible reset in just about any scenario.

  11. Daphne says:

    hey JD,

    I found that book “interesting” at first too, until I realised how much my mind was stretched by the thoughts it put forth, and I’m eternally grateful I read it.

    I like the way you picked out the three learning points you found useful. Yes we do create our own experiences and the sooner we realise this and get control over our lives, the happier, more successful, more at peace we are! In my experience anyway. Thanks for sharing about the book.

  12. riza tendero says:

    hi, jd, i have the book but i have not gotten the chance to read it yet… will definitely look into it. i agree that we “choose” who we want to be (consciously and subconsciously). my life has been a constant search for congruence, from where i’m currently at and where i thought i wanted to be. For the most part, there was confusion in what i thought i wanted and how i really felt inside. going thru a “crisis” the past year has opened my eyes to insights and opportunities that have always been there. just didn’t see them before cause i perceived them in a different light …. guess i’ve had a paradigm shift.

    just wanted to say that am deeply grateful i stumbled on your site…the authors you quote are same ones i’ve read from yet i am now absorbing what they say in a way i never did before. thanks to how you’ve outlined things….it’s been easier to understand and enjoy my journey…:)

  13. JD says:

    @ Daphne — It’s a pretty amazing book. I went through it fast, but a lot of things stuck deeper than I expected and made me think. It’s one of those books that instead of remembering text on a page, I remember scenes in my mind.

    @ Riza — I think you found the key. We can’t always bridge the gap between the life we wanted and the life we have. But, we can bridge the gap between who we want to be and the way we live our moments, regardless of the circumstances. It’s like in a movie, how our favorite character can have good situations and bad situations, but they are the same character in every scene.

    Increasing congruence with who we want to be is a good thing, and yes, it’s a paradigm shift. Once we shift our mental models, the rest follows, and it sounds like you’re on your path.

  14. Chris Edgar says:

    Hi J.D. — thanks for this — that’s something that’s definitely been on my mind recently — the difference between just learning facts and strategies, and actually finding them out for yourself through personal experience. I find that, when someone is speaking from personal experience in something they tell me, I feel more drawn to hear what they have to say.

  15. Hi J.D.

    Never heard of these books. Will look for them next time I’m at the library.

    Yes, we are here for the experience yet that gets lost in the faux experiences we’re taught at a young ago to go after.

    We enter the planet with the right intentions but get sidetracked, often for our entire lives.

    For example, go shopping and buy things instead of go hiking and look at a pond teaming with life. Or sit at a desk and memorize things for a test, when you’ll forget all of that in less than a year because you’ve got new stuff you’ve been asked to memorize.

    Great reminder! thanks. Giulietta

  16. JD says:

    @ Chris — I too am a fan of hearing from people talking from experience. I think of it as empathy for information. Empathy for information means that you have an emotional connection to the information, from personal experience. While we can share information, it’s tough to share knowledge or wisdom. When you have personal experience with the information, you can more effectively relate to it, prioritize it, make sense of it, etc.

    @ Giulietta — “teaming with life” … well put. It’s like looking for life in the all the wrong places, until we figure out what counts, and it’s always right under our feet.