Sources of Insight Better Insights, Better Results 2015-04-24T16:59:57Z http://sourcesofinsight.com/feed/atom/ WordPress JD <![CDATA[Should You Focus on Gain or Loss?]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26422 2015-04-24T16:43:18Z 2015-04-24T16:39:32Z If you want to be more persuasive, you need to know when to focus on gains and when to focus on losses. People react differently to messages and facts depending on how they are framed. A message can emphasize benefits, "gain-framed", or it can emphasize costs, "loss-framed."

The post Should You Focus on Gain or Loss? appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
image

“An evil gain equals a loss.” — Syrus

Should you focus on the positive benefits?

Or, should you focus on the cost or risk or loss of not doing something?

If you want to be more persuasive, you need to know when to focus on gains and when to focus on losses.

A gain-frame is when you frame a message focused on the positive outcome.  A loss-frame is when you focus on the costs or the loss, such as opportunity cost.

The key thing to keep in mind is that we do more to avoid pain, than to seek gain, and that we prefer more certain outcomes than uncertain alternatives.

Gain and Loss Framing

Prospect Theory helps us understand how we look at gains and losses.

According to Prospect Theory, individuals are more sensitive to minor losses than to minor gains.

In other words, we do more to get out of pain, then we do for gain.

To elaborate, people react differently to messages and facts depending on how they are framed.  A message can emphasize benefits (gain-framed), or it can emphasize costs (loss-framed.)

  • Gain-Framed Message:  You will live longer if you quit smoking.
  • Loss-Framed Message:  You will die sooner if you do not quit smoking.

If a behavior leads to a relatively certain outcome, then gain-framed messages can work well.

If a behavior leads to a more uncertain outcome, then loss-framed messages are more effective.

Gain and Loss Framing Example

Because the outcome is clear, you would focus on the benefits of using sun screen.   A gain-framed message would be “Prevent skin cancer by using sun screen.”

In contrast, because the outcome is not clear of screening mammographies, you would use a loss-framed message.   The behavior is risky and the outcome is uncertain, since breast cancer may or may not be detected.

Save Lives or Reduce Deaths?

Would you choose to save 200 lives?  What if it meant losing 400 lives?

In a classic example, psychologists Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman tested how participants would react based on different phrasing for a hypothetical life and death scenario.

If participants were told a positive frame, “Saves 200 lives”, they chose Treatment A over Treatment B, 72% of the time.

If participants were told a negative frame “400 people will die”, they chose Treatment A only 22% of the time.

Framing Treatment A Treatment B
Positive “Saves 200 lives” “A 33% chance of saving all 600 people, 66% possibility of saving no one.”
Negative “400 people will die” “A 33% chance that no people will die, 66% probability that all 600 will die.”

The Certainty Effect

A related concept to be aware of is the Certainty Effect.   Here is a quick summary of the Certainty Effect according to Psychlopedia:

“Although a focus on gains and losses generates different preferences, some inclinations of individuals are manifested in both scenarios. For instance, as Kahneman and Tversky (1979) showed, individuals tend to prefer certain to uncertain alternatives in general–a tendency called the certainty effect. “

Key Take Aways

Here are my key take aways on gain-and loss-framing::

  • Gain-and loss-framed messages are differently persuasive.
  • If a behavior leads to a relatively certain outcome, then gain-framed messages work well.
  • If a behavior leads to a more uncertain outcome, then loss-framed messages are more effective.
  • Gain-framed messages can be more persuasive than loss-framed messages when the outcome is clear and obvious.
  • We’re more sensitive to minor losses than to minor gains.
  • When we experience intense feelings, either positive or negative, the effect of loss framing on risk-taking diminishes.
  • When we experience positive feelings, the effect of gain framing on risk aversion also subsides.
  • In general, we prefer certain alternatives to uncertain alternatives.

Additional Resources

Here are a few good articles that really elaborate on gain-and loss framing:

You Might Also Like

Choice

How To Expand Your Choices in Any Situation

Refuse the Sucker’s Choice

Image by Bob Whitehead.

The post Should You Focus on Gain or Loss? appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
0
JD <![CDATA[Why I Draw People and Animals (And What I’ve Learned From It Over The Years!)]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26409 2015-04-22T15:08:59Z 2015-04-22T15:04:07Z Rebecca Tsien is an artist that draws people and animals. Rebecca has found a way to do what makes her come alive. Not everybody does.

The post Why I Draw People and Animals (And What I’ve Learned From It Over The Years!) appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
imageThis is a guest post by Rebecca Tsien.

Rebecca is an artist … Not just any artist. 

Her specialty is drawing people and animals.

But what’s truly important is that she loves and lives her work.

Rebecca has found a way to do what makes her come alive.

Not everybody does.

So I thought it would be great to hear from Rebecca herself on what she learned by drawing people and animals over the years.

Without further ado, here’s Rebecca …

When J.D. contacted me and asked me to do a guest blog, asking me to look within myself and ask why I draw portraits of people and animals and what I’ve learned from it over the years, I thought ‘oh wow J.D. what a great challenge!’. Over the span of a few days, which turned into a week and much crumbled up paper, I said to myself ‘oh wow J.D., this isn’t as easy as I thought’ :)

Because, in all honesty, I’ve never really given it much thought. Drawing, to me, is as natural as breathing. There has never been a time when I didn’t draw. Even when I didn’t work as an artist, I still drew. Or thought about projects I’d like to do if only I had the time.

So, why do I draw?

I think that growing up as the child of older parents I was always finding myself being dragged along to adult functions and parties. Also, as my parents had extremely busy gourmet food stores, I would oftentimes find myself sitting in the back of a store on a bag of coffee beans listening to adult concerns, and sometimes stressful conversations. As a result, I think that I was somewhat more comfortable with adults and definitely shy around my peers. I was an observer of things around me for sure.

The times that I truly felt most comfortable were with my dogs and my paper and pencils. When I drew, I was transported to a wonderful, calm world where I could make up my own characters and stories. I was always interested in movies, so I would create my own movie magazines with fictional movie stars!

Why people and animals?

Faces, to me, are the most incredible things. They are these beautiful, often flawed, road maps that lead inward to a person’s (or pet’s) soul and as much as we’d like to think that we can put on a brave face and hide our life experiences it all still comes through in our faces. A person’s eyes, in particular, tell the real story. The corners of the mouth are also very telling.

image

I recently did a portrait of Robin Williams, using a fairly recent reference photo, and his sadness was so visible in his eyes to me. Even through his smile. He looked world-weary.

I also find drawing people and animals extremely therapeutic and meditative.

The first time I drew someone who had recently passed, I was very young and my Great Uncle Frank Meier had recently passed very unexpectedly. I thought to myself ‘I wonder if Aunt June would like a nice picture of him?’

So, I sat down with a photo of him that my mom had taken only weeks before and I drew a portrait. It wasn’t the greatest work I’d ever done, but when I handed it to my Aunt June she started to cry…but she was also very happy. That feeling stayed with me forever…that maybe I could do something nice to remember a person by and also help myself recover from their loss.

I recently lost an amazing friend. She was my daughter’s first grade teacher who passed way too early cancer. It was a devastating loss, a loss where there really weren’t any words to make sense of things. I was able to find a tremendous amount of peace from sitting down each day and working on her portrait…it was almost as if I was able to go back and visit her each time even though she was not longer in this world.

I thought about conversations we’d had, her telling me about driving into Newark, NJ to pick up her mother for weekend visits. I thought about what I know of her life and family, etc.

I felt extremely lucky to have had that time with her again while I did her portrait, and I feel that way with any person or pet that I paint. If I know or knew the subject (human or animal) I remember our times together. If the subject is someone famous, I think about the incredible body of work they produced, their personal lives and what might have been.

It’s really a wonderful experience for me. Not to sound like a nutty psychic, but I always feel a real connection with my subject, whether they’ve moved on from this world or not.

What have I learned from doing portraits over the years? And more importantly…what would I go back and tell my younger self if I could do things over?

Biggest Pro:

As much as you may want to believe you are an expert at any point in your life, you are not! There is ALWAYS something new to learn and master and enjoy! I’m sure everyone can identify with me when I say that I was voted “Best Artist” in high school, and I knew EVERYTHING there was to know about art! And so, I hopped on the train with my oversized portfolio and supplies into New York where I started college at Parsons School of Design.

image

Lo and behold I met thousands of “Best Artist” winners (chuckle), the majority of them much better than me. I said to myself, ‘gee, I guess maybe I don’t know everything just yet’.

The same applied for my first Art Director job. I knew everything about desktop publishing…I had this down! Slowly, the first pages that I worked on came back with production problems and I realized that I had a bit more learning to do.

The beautiful thing is that learning is a never-ending journey, and it keeps your mind young forever. That includes the failures along with the successes.

Never be afraid of failing even if takes a hundred times to get something right. The hundred and first time, it will work (or hundred and second…). When I started drawing directly into Adobe Photoshop with a device called a Wacom Cintiq, I wanted to throw it out the back window of my house. How could something look so easy, yet be so hard. I love working with it now, but I’m still learning and improving on it.

The other important thing that I would tell my younger self is to ‘believe in your abilities’. Stick with it!

I know that this is the oldest nauseating cliché in the book, but it is the honest truth. If you believe you can accomplish something and are willing to put the time and effort in, you will be successful.

Don’t listen to those voices (the little evil ones from within, and the ones from outside) telling you that you don’t have what it takes, that you will starve, etc. Those voices will always be there, and it’s up to you to cancel them out. It’s okay to believe in oneself, to be one’s own cheerleader.

image

I wish I had taken that route when I first got out of college, but I only ended up as an illustrator after taking a lot of wrong turns along the way. When I graduated from Parsons, my parents were immediately afraid that I wouldn’t survive doing entry-level art jobs in New York City. In all honesty, the jobs that I saw in the newspapers paid next to nothing and I would have had to struggle big time. So instead, I headed off to a highly respected finishing school to learn administrative skills. Sigh.

I should have said no, but I didn’t follow my heart and I didn’t have a whole lot of self-confidence back then.

As a result, I spent a good many years being miserable in jobs that I just didn’t have my heart in and quite frankly, was not very good at! (I’m sure I made my bosses extremely miserable too!). Finally, I made my way back to art and publishing.

Along the way, I took night and weekend classes to learn how to do artwork and magazine layout on computers in programs like Adobe Photoshop, Quark and Illustrator. By waiting to work in what I truly loved, I met wonderful people and made lasting friendships which I will always be grateful for. I lost valuable time, though, in the world of art.

If I could do it again, I would stick with what I love… struggles, starvation, failures and all.

That’s what I always tell my kids…find something that you love, and you’ll be successful at it.

Find something that you will want to do for a lifetime, not because you have to but because you’re passionate about it and can’t imagine ever living without it.

It’s worth it.


You can follow Rebecca Tsien on Facebook where she shares her thoughts and art, and you can connect with Rebecca on her Web page at Rebecca Tsien Illustrations..

The post Why I Draw People and Animals (And What I’ve Learned From It Over The Years!) appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
0
JD <![CDATA[Good Morning]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26374 2015-04-20T13:29:57Z 2015-04-20T05:23:20Z Remember that good morning … where the sun is shining, the sky is blue, the grass is green, and the birds are singing. And there’s a warm breeze that carries the essence of a garden in full bloom softly through the open window.

The post Good Morning appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
image

Good morning … Rise and shine.

I think that a large part of how we experience life is shaped by our experiences, expectations, and the images we hold in our mind.

Lately, I was reflecting back on scenes from perfect mornings …

The Perfect Start to Your Morning

Remember that good morning … where the sun is shining, the sky is blue, the grass is green, and the birds are singing.

And there’s a warm breeze that carries the essence of a garden in full bloom softly through the open window.

I’ve seen scenes like this in movies and in T.V. shows, and I’ve experienced good mornings in real life.

So what I want to create here is a reminder of just such a good morning.

Classical “Morning Sunrise” Songs

Here are a couple of classical morning sunrise songs that accentuate the start of a beautiful day:

  1. Call To The Cows (a section of the “William Tell Overture”) by Gioacchino Rossini
  2. Morning Mood by Edvard Grieg

Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah Video

If you need something a bit more visual to really bootstrap your day, here is a link to a video of the original classic Disney song, Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah, that you might recognize:

If the video doesn’t play for you inline, you can find it online with the following link:

Video: Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah (Original)

Be Your Own Source of Sunshine

And if you do wake up on the wrong side of the bed, here’s a quote by Sam Sundquist that reminds us how we can get a fresh start:

“Some days you just have to create your own sunshine.”

Be your own source of sunshine and shine your way to a brighter day.

I hope that between the imagery, the songs, and this little vignette of a good morning that it helps inspire the start of your day.

Let this good morning post be your little dose of sunshine.

It’s here whenever you need it.

What’s your vision or vignette of a good morning?

The post Good Morning appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
2
JD <![CDATA[Knowledge On How To Change]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26334 2015-04-20T14:20:43Z 2015-04-17T16:10:20Z Knowledge is a key building block of change management. If you want to drive a change, you need to help build the knowledge that individuals need to make the change.

The post Knowledge On How To Change appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
image

“Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.” — Leo Tolstoy

Knowledge is a key building block of change management.

If you want to drive a change, you need to help build the knowledge that individuals need to make the change.

Individuals need two types of knowledge: 1) how to change during the transition, and 2) how to perform effectively in the future state.

Keep in mind that knowledge is only effective if there is already awareness and desire to make the change.  If the individuals don’t care about making a change, then the knowledge will be irrelevant.

In the book ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community, Jeffrey Hiatt shows us how to create a desire for change using 4 factors that influence a desire to change.

What Builds Knowledge on How To Change?

Hiatt provides some examples of the kinds of knowledge needed to implement a change:

  1. Training and education on the skills and behaviors needed to change
  2. Detailed information on how to use new processes, systems and tools
  3. Understanding of the new roles and responsibilities associated with the change

To deliver the knowledge on how to make the change, you could include anything from formal training programs to job aides to one-on-one coaching to user groups and forums.

4 Factors that Impact Knowledge on How to Change

According to Hiatt, the following four factors influence the knowledge on how to change:

  1. Factor 1 – The current knowledge base of an individual
  2. Factor 2 – The capacity or capability of this person to gain additional knowledge
  3. Factor 3 – The resources available for education and training
  4. Factor 4 – The access to, or existence of, the required knowledge

Factor 1 – The current knowledge base of an individual

The change is a lot easier if somebody already has the knowledge.   The gap between what they know and what they need to know is the challenge that you need to address.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“The gap between a person’s current knowledge level and the knowledge requirement associated with the change will directly impact the probability of success for those individuals. The current knowledge base of an individual could be in the form of education or work experience.”

Factor 2 – Capability of the person to learn

How easily a person learns will impact the success of the change.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“In addition to the knowledge gap that may exist, each of us has a different capacity to learn. Some people pick up new information easily, whereas others struggle to learn new processes or tools. For example, some people learn new concepts quickly, but have difficulty learning technical skills.”

Factor 3 – Resources available to provide education and training

Availability of resources will impact the knowledge, which will impact the success of the change.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“Some companies have extensive resources and funding to deliver training. Other firms struggle to provide any type of structured education to support a change. Resources could include the availability of subject matter experts, instructors, classroom facilities, books and materials, equipment and systems for student
use, and funding to support the training program overall.”

Factor 4 – The access to, or existence of, the required knowledge

Access to the knowledge that individuals need impact the success of the change.  If the knowledge exists, but people can’t get to it, it’s not going to help.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“For some desired changes, the knowledge may not be accessible or may not exist. Depending on an organization’s geographic location, the ready access to knowledge may be a barrier to learning. Some parts of the world have very little access to educational institutions and subject matter experts.”

While ultimately, change is up to the individual, you can make change a whole lot easier by creating awareness, influencing desire, and building knowledge to support the change.

Knowledge is a fundamental part of your overall change management approach.

You Might Also Like

Awareness is the First Step of Change

Change Quotes

Desire to Change

The Challenge of Personal Change

Why People Resist Change

Image by worldwaterweek.

The post Knowledge On How To Change appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
0
JD <![CDATA[Desire to Change]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26305 2015-04-20T14:18:19Z 2015-04-15T17:41:54Z If you want to drive a change, you need to create a desire for change. Jeffrey Hiatt shows us how to create a desire for change using 4 factors that influence a desire to change.

The post Desire to Change appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
image

“Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.” — George Bernard Shaw

If you want to drive a change, you need to create a desire for change.

Creating a desire for change is a challenge, because we have limited control over another person’s choices.

When we build awareness, we can use proven practices to generate awareness of the need for change.  Unfortunately, creating the desire for change is not under our direct control.

In the book ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community, Jeffrey Hiatt shows us how to create a desire for change using 4 factors that influence a desire to change.

Don’t Assume Building Awareness Builds Desire

Just because you created awareness of the need to change, does not mean that you’ve created desire.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“A common mistake made by many business leaders is to assume that by building awareness of the need for change they have also created desire. Resistance to change from employees takes them by surprise and they find themselves unprepared to manage this resistance.”

The 4 Factors of Desire to Change

According to Hiatt, there are four factors that influence a desire to change:

  1. Factor 1 – The nature of the change (what the change is and how it will impact them)
  2. Factor 2 – The organizational or environmental context for the change (their perception of the organization)
  3. Factor 3 – An individual’s personal situation
  4. Factor 4 – What motivates them (those intrinsic motivators that are unique to an individual)

Factor 1 – The nature of the change and WIIFM

You need to address the question, “What’s In It For Me?” so that people know what the change is and what it means to them.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“A person or group assesses the nature of a change on a variety of levels that include “What is the change?” and “How will the change impact me?”  This is often termed “What’s in it for me?” or WIIFM.  

They will determine if the change represents an opportunity or a threat.

They may also assess how fairly they think the change will be deployed with other individuals or groups. If individuals perceive inequity between groups, this alone can provide an excuse to resist change.”

Factor 2 – Organizational or environmental context

The context where the change is taking place will impact the desire for change.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

”Organizational or environmental context represents how a person or group views the environment that is subject to the change. Because each person’s experience is unique, this assessment of the surroundings will vary from person to person.

In the workplace, this organizational context includes the success of past changes, how much change is already going on, reinforcements or rewards that were part of past change, the organization’s culture and the overall direction of the organization.”

Factor 3 – An individual’s personal situation

An individual’s personal situation will impact the desire for change.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

”Individual or personal context is the third factor that contributes to a person’s desire to change.

Personal context includes all aspects of a person’s life situation, including family status, mobility (are they in a position to be flexible in terms of where they live?), financial security, age, health, career aspirations (are they where they expected to be at this point in their career?), relationships at home and at work, educational background, upcoming personal events and past success in this work environment (promotions, recognition, compensation).”

Factor 4 – Intrinsic motivation

An individual’s personal motivation will impact the desire for change.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

”Intrinsic or personal motivation is the fourth element that contributes to a person’s desire to change. Personal motivators are those inherent attributes that make us individuals. They range from the desire to help others and make a difference in our world, to the avoidance of pain or negative consequences. Some of us seek advancement while others want depth in relationships.  Some desire respect, power or position. Some strive for financial security.

What drives each of us to change is unique and falls along a broad spectrum of motivators.

Personal motivation not only includes what we value, but also our internal belief that we could achieve what we want should we choose to move forward. It is our internal compass that communicates to us the likelihood or probability that we would obtain the desired result from this change.”

To recap, you can control building awareness.

You can’t control creating desire.

But you can influence desire more effectively if you know the four factors of desire to change:

What’s In It For Me (WIIFM), Context, Individual Situations, and Individual Motivations.

You Might Also Like

Awareness is the First Step of Change

Change is Good

Change Quotes

The Challenge of Personal Change

Why People Resist Change

Image by Andreas Ivarsson.

The post Desire to Change appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
0
JD <![CDATA[Awareness is the First Step of Change]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26285 2015-04-17T15:18:57Z 2015-04-14T17:28:04Z Change is hard. Jeffrey Hiatt shares the number one reason people resist change and what to do about it.

The post Awareness is the First Step of Change appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
image

“It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” — Charles Darwin

Change is hard.

Many people resist it.

But all too often people get characterized as “they don’t like change” when in reality, I think it’s more a case of poor change leadership.

Change is a subjective experience, and I don’t ever see anybody complain about changes that they think are good.

Change is hard when people don’t know why there is a need to change.

You can usually trace resistance to change back to a lack of awareness, and nobody walked through the benefits of the change in a meaningful way.

In the book ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community, Jeffrey Hiatt shares the number one reason people resist change and what to do about it.

The #1 Reason for Resistance to Change is Lack of Awareness

The number one reason that people resist change is because of a lack of awareness.

People want to know what’s driving the change.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“In a 2005 study with 411 companies undergoing major change projects, the number one reason for resistance to change was lack of awareness of why the change was being made.  Project managers of these major change initiatives stated that employees and managers alike wanted to know the business reasons for the change so they could better understand the change and align themselves with the direction of the organization.”

What Should You Communicate About the Change?

If there’s one thing you do, give people compelling reasons for change.

Answer the question “Why change?”

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“Communicate the business need for change and explain why the change is necessary; provide the compelling reasons for the change and emphasize the risk of not changing.”

Should Employees Ask Why Change?

Some managers don’t think that employees need to know why a change is important.

They think employees just need to do their job.

They’re wrong.

People can’t do their job well if they don’t understand why they are doing something, and what it’s supposed to achieve.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“Some managers argue, however that employees do not need to know the reasons behind every change.  They hold the position that employees are compensated for performing a job, and if that job should change, employees should just do those new tasks rather than ask why a change is needed.”

Medical Personnel, Firefighters and Military Don’t Need to Answer Why Change

When you’re under the gun, so to speak, and you’re in critical scenarios, not everybody can afford to ask and answer why questions.

But that’s the exception, not the norm.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“When an organization has a high degree of control over an individual’s actions and choices, whether through circumstances or mutual agreement, this viewpoint may not be an obstacle to change.  For example, medical first responders and firefighters have established protocols and a clear chain of command.  When emergency circumstances dictate a change in their response, rescue personnel do not stop to ask why.  Likewise, when soldiers are operating under a crisis situation, the long-honored nature of military relationships enables a rapid compliance to change.   However, these extraordinary, time-critical situations are more the exception than the rule.”

High-Performing Workplace Environments Do Need to Answer Why Change

If you’re in a high-performing workplace, where employees are actually engaged in their work and play an active role in improving how work gets done, you’ll want them to really understand why there is a need for change, and what it means to them.

Via ADKAR: A Model for Change in Business, Government and our Community:

“In many high-performing workplace environments, an organization’s control over an individual’s day-to-day work is low.  For example, manufacturing employees using Six Sigma techniques are engaged in the everyday improvement of work processes.  These employees take ownership of both the work product and associated procedures.  They assume accountability for the results of their work.  In these circumstances, organizations have a lower degree of direct control over their employee’s day-to-day activities.  When changes are mandated from above, these employees are the first to ask ‘Why is this change being made?’

An organization’s control over the day-to-day tasks of professional employees is even less.  The information age has brought more educated and mobile employees into companies.  When they do not understand the reasons for change or do not agree with those reasons, they can create formidable resistance and barriers to change within an organization.”

4 Components to Address When You Build Awareness for Change

According to Jeffrey Hiatt, there are four components that you need to address when you are trying to build awareness of the need for change:

  1. What is the nature of the change and how does the change align with the vision for the organization?
  2. Why is the change made and what are the risks of not changing?
  3. How will the change impact our organization or our community?
  4. What’s in it for me (WIIFM)?

5 Success Factors for Creating Awareness

According to Jeffrey Hiatt , there are 5 factors that influence the success of creating awareness of the need for change.

  1. Factor 1 — A person’s view of the current state
  2. Factor 2 — How a person perceives problems
  3. Factor 3 — The credibility of the sender
  4. Factor 4 — Circulation of misinformation or rumors
  5. Factor 5 — Contestability of the reasons for change

If you can nail these 5 success factors, you can exponentially improve your success at creating awareness of the need for change.

Change is Good, If the Changes are Good

I’ve seen many changes rolled out where it’s obvious that nobody talked to the people that have to use the change.   And in many of these cases, the changes were not improvements because nobody actually tested what the changed would mean in real-life to real users and real people that it impacts.

For me, I see change as opportunity, but I don’t like changes for change’s sake.

I do like changes that actually make things better.

So whenever somebody wants to drive a change, I always want to know what problem are they solving, and what the change would actually mean to the people, the system, and the ecosystem involved.

It turns out, I’m not the only one who wants to know why a change is necessary.

So if you want to be a more effective change leader and improve your influence, let people know what’s driving the change, what’s in it for them, and the opportunity cost of not changing.

People aren’t puppets.

You Might Also Like

3 Keys to Lasting Change

Change is Good

Change Quotes

The Challenge of Personal Change

Why People Resist Change

Image by Antara.

The post Awareness is the First Step of Change appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
0
JD <![CDATA[Interview – Taffy Williams on How Entrepreneurs Can Think Agile]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26258 2015-04-13T15:51:51Z 2015-04-13T15:32:48Z In Think Agile, Taffy explains how entrepreneurs can develop an Agile Mindset and why this flexibility is so important.

The post Interview – Taffy Williams on How Entrepreneurs Can Think Agile appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
image

“Luck is not a factor. Hope is not a strategy. Fear is not an option.” – James Cameron

Taffy Williams is founder and president of Colonial Technology Development, a company that helps entrepreneurs launch biotech, software, and pharmaceutical companies.

Taffy is also the author of Think Agile: How Smart Entrepreneurs Adapt in Order to Succeed.

In Think Agile, Taffy explains how entrepreneurs can develop an Agile Mindset and why this flexibility is so important.

We live in an age where technology changes rapidly and market shifts happen overnight.  Whether you are a solo-preneur, intra-preneur, or entrepreneur, you can no longer be wedded to one idea.

You need the ability to explore multiple ideas, and expect the unexpected.  In essence, you need to think Agile and respond to change.

This is my interview with Taffy to help dive deeper into how entrepreneurs can think Agile and develop their Agile mindset.

Q: What is an Agile mindset?

Taffy Williams:

The Agile mindset requires flexibility in your thinking and actions.

Agile thinking includes exploring alternatives, getting rapid feedback, testing paths, making adjustments, and reacting quickly to unexpected events.

It is important that Agile thinkers learn to recognize potential barriers in advance and explore alternatives, pivot quickly when needed, generate new alternatives to the unexpected, and not get stuck on a singular path to a goal.

Agile thinkers realize that they must question the status quo, take more than one shot on goal, banish bureaucracy, accept failure as a cost of doing business, and they believe they can do anything.

They know that their agility improves the chances at being successful and that it does not guarantee success.

Agile thinkers realize that if they improve their odds their chances of success are improved as well.  Depending on the project or program, the phrase “fail often and fail fast” is an important one because it is sometimes easier to fix a known problem and improve the product once you see what does not work.

Q: What is life like for an Agile entrepreneur?

Taffy Williams:

Agile thinkers are always monitoring their business and considering potential issues that can hold them back or improve their success.

They often explore more than one path to reach a goal and use their team’s knowledge and skill.

Whether it is a day, a week, or longer, the process remains much the same.  They are driven by achievement of goals using the  strategies that deliver the best results, costs, and products.

One important consideration is looking for any impediment that can derail getting to a goal, stop a program, halt development, reduce sales or impede the business in some manner.  Recognizing such factors in advance allows  an agile thinker to develop alternatives if the negative event occurs.

When a totally unexpected event occurs, the Agile thinker will rapidly pivot and develop alternative solutions that may work.  For example, if an Agile entrepreneur wants to raise capital, they may explore several paths to getting funding, so if one path fails, there are still more options on the table

Agile entrepreneurs are also prepared to take advantage of unexpected good events.  By being ready to take action, they can capitalize quickly on positive events and take the business to a much higher level.

Q. What are the key advantages of an Agile entrepreneur over a traditional entrepreneur?

Taffy Williams:

Being agile  makes success more likely.

It allows entrepreneurs to rapidly respond to problems and  impediments because they considered potential solutions in advance, and were ready for action.

The ability to quickly identify unexpected problems and develop novel alternatives increases speed and Agile entrepreneurs are more likely to  overcome a problem before it  becomes unfixable.

Q. How can an Agile entrepreneur rebound from mistakes and failures?

Taffy Williams:

Difficult situations often have a solution that lessen the burden or eliminate a problem.

It is very stressful when you’re in the middle of those kinds of situations.

There are a few steps that may help in creating a new path or overcoming a problem.   First, it is important to not panic and maintain composure.  You have to treat the situation like others where you logically identify possible steps that approach a resolution.

Second, try to learn as much as possible  in the time available.  This includes speaking with your team, advisors, and others to get different ideas based on their knowledge and experiences.

If time permits, step away from the problem for a short while.  Allow your creativity to take over so you can create a tailored solution to your particular issue.

There will be a few situations where you already have significant knowledge and your gut reactions may provide a direction.  If this seems to be the case, wait a while before taking that path.  Make sure you have thought it through and are not working out of negative emotions.

One such situation occurred during an $18 million financing when the syndicate reneged 3 days before the shareholder vote to approve the deal  I had constructed.  It took every bit of calm imaginable to turn the deal around over the next few months while facing bankruptcy!

Q. How can an Agile entrepreneur get beyond the “Foolproof Formula?”

Taffy Williams:

There is never a full proof formula for all situations.

What you can do is increase your odds of success, but you can never guarantee success.

As an Agile entrepreneur, it’s important that you recognize failure is an option and you must be able to live with it.

It’s critical that if failure does occur that it’s  not because  you failed to take the right steps or because you performed horribly.  It helps to find alternatives and work on strategy development with your team.  Then work on  alternate routes deliberately and aggressively, and make adjustments as needed.

If you recognize potential problems in advance, and have strategies in place to deal with them, this can help reduce negative impact if the problem arises.  Developing multiple paths to achieve a goal increases the chances of reaching the goal.

The key is to explore multiple options and pivot quickly when needed to ensure you find something that works.

Q. How can an Agile entrepreneur plan for the unexpected, and prepare for the unpredictable?

Taffy Williams:

We can always plan for potential issues that may arise.

The number of unexpected issues to consider may be reduced by looking closely at the steps leading to a goal.

Unexpected events occur all the time.

They aren’t possible to predict or seemed so unlikely that planning for them made no sense.  However, recognizing a problem quickly is essential to adapting and surviving.

Once you’ve identified a situation, consider as many alternatives to solving the problem and select those you think are the best.  The alternative solutions may be run at the same time or try one first, then the next.

The exploration of alternatives followed by solid execution is critical to success.

It is also important to monitor your progress and adjust your actions as needed.

At a minimum, do not let the unpredictable bad events kill the business.  If they are unpredictably good events, do not let them go by without taking advantage of them.

Q. How can a traditional entrepreneur think Agile and develop an Agile Mindset in a pragmatic way?

Taffy Williams:

Start simply by examining the activities already underway.

For example, are there key employees that are so essential a program would be severely delayed if they were to leave?  Consider steps that can reduce the likelihood  of them wanting to leave and also what you would do if the employees left.

Are you trying to get funding for your company?  There may be a multiple sources of funding you can tap, like grants, loans, partnerships, and financing.  Explore whether you can handle more than one of these simultaneously to increase your odds of finding funds in the shortest time.

You can become a more Agile entrepreneur by learning to examine the most important parts of your business and considering the more obvious “what if” scenarios.

The result is that you’ll get practice at being Agile, and you may be able to act faster in a bad situation or take advantage of a good one.


You can connect with Taffy Williams through his Startup Blog and on Twitter.  Taffy’s book, Think Agile: How Smart Entrepreneurs Adapt in Order to Succeed is available on Amazon in both hardcover and Kindle.

You Might Also Like

Agile Results QuickStart

Getting Started with Agile Results

Interview with Entrepreneur’s Library on Getting Results the Agile Way

The post Interview – Taffy Williams on How Entrepreneurs Can Think Agile appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
0
JD <![CDATA[10 Big Ideas from The Art of Work]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26233 2015-04-11T15:09:14Z 2015-04-11T14:44:06Z The Art of Work is a book about using work as a platform for realizing your potential and making a difference. It's a book about finding your calling, taking on work that's bigger than you, and mastering your craft.

The post 10 Big Ideas from The Art of Work appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
image

“When love and skill work together expect a masterpiece.” — John Ruskin

I finished reading The Art of Work: A Proven Path to Discovering What You Were Meant to Do, by Jeff Goins.

It’s a book about using work as a platform for realizing your potential and making a difference in the world.

Your world.

It’s a book about finding your calling, taking on work that’s bigger than you, and mastering your craft.

The The Art of Work is about doing the work you love and living your work in a way that your work becomes your ultimate form of self-expression.

When your life is one portfolio of your interests, passions, and activities, and you treat your calling as a lifestyle, your work becomes a never-ending source of inspiration and fulfillment.

The promise is compelling and the path is slippery.  Jeff provides the rails to hold on to as you begin your journey of self-discovery, you make your ascent, and you deliver your eminent performance.

1. Your Purpose is More of a Path than a Plan

When you climb to the top of the mountain and look out, you realize that there is another mountain.  And another one after that.  You then realize that it’s not about getting to the top.  It’s about enjoying the climb.

Via The Art of Work:

“When asked how I got to this point, I struggle to give an intelligent answer. The experience of finding your calling can be both mysterious and practical. It takes effort but also seems to happen to you at times. What I’ve come to understand is that finding your purpose is more of a path than a plan: it involves twists and turns that you never expected. Ultimately these surprises lead you to your destiny. And once you arrive at what you thought was the destination, you realize it’s only another leg in the journey.”

2. Become More than a By-Stander

Great work is an immersive experience.  It’s not something you watch from the sidelines.  You need to dive in.

Via The Art of Work:

“But something must occur for this to take place. The person must enter the story, either by choice or because she’s forced into it. Belle goes to find her father. Luke leaves home with Obi-Wan. Dorothy gets swept up in a tornado. In any great narrative, there is a moment when a character must decide to become more than a bystander. It’s an important moment that always seems to happen in the mind before it unfolds in real life. This choice, though, is always preceded by something deeper, a nagging feeling that there must be more.”

3. Listen to Your Life

Life reflects back at you.   It echoes back to you what you are good at, what you are not so good at, what you are capable of, and what your life really wants to do with you.

Listen to what your life really wants to do with you and explore what you are capable of, and you just might surprise yourself.

Via The Art of Work:

“We all want to begin with ability, with what we can do. But when have you ever been a good judge of what you’re capable of? People are always doing things that amaze themselves. A calling goes beyond your abilities and calls into question your potential. And when the journey is complete, even you are surprised. Just because you can become an astronaut or a newspaper deliveryman does not mean you should. Each person is responsible to not only do what she is capable of but also what she is meant to do.
In the words of author and activist Parker Palmer, don’t just tell your life what you want to do with it; listen to what it wants to do with you.”

4. Each Wrong Choice Grows You for What’s Next

You don’t learn anything by playing it safe.  And you don’t learn what you are truly capable of by not committing.

But if you commit to a path, you learn.  You learn from the experience.  And it grows you.  It makes you stronger and more resilient.

And when you learn, you can also change your path, if that path is not for you.   This is how you get started, and this is how you start to unfold your personal journey of finding your true calling.

Via The Art of Work:

“Here’s the truth. The risk of not committing is greater than the cost of making the wrong choice. Because when you fail, you learn.
But what happens when you don’t commit, when you choose to not act? Well, nothing. When you pause without intent, when you stall due to fear, you don’t learn a thing. Each wrong choice grows your character and strengthens your resilience, readying you for what comes next. Failure is a friend dressed up like an enemy.”

5. You Must Love the Work

If your heart’s not in it, you won’t stick with it.  And sticking with it, is what it takes to do great work.

Via The Art of Work:

“I don’t know where this idea that your calling is supposed to be easy comes from. Rarely do easy and greatness go together. The art of doing hard things requires an uncommon level of dedication.
You have to love the work to be able to persevere through those difficult times, those painful moments when you would probably rather quit. How do you do that without an uncanny amount of passion? It’s not possible. You must love the work. Not until you find something you can do to the point of exhaustion, to the extent
that you almost hate it but can return to it tomorrow, have you found something worth pursuing.”

6. Turn in the Direction of Your True Calling

It’s possible that all of your days, or all of your years, or all of your moments, have prepared you, for what you need to do next.

Via The Art of Work:

“In any vocation, there comes a time when you realize the path you’re on is not taking you where you want to go. All this preparation has culminated in helping you achieve the wrong goal. At those times, you might feel stuck. What do you do then? You do what William Hung finally did. You realize it’s never too late to change and take a turn in the direction of your true calling.”

7. Your Life is One Portfolio

Your life is a great symphony with many crescendos along the way, when you look at your life as one portfolio of all your passions, talents, and activities you do.

It’s this bigger picture view where your life takes on new meaning, and, as a result, so does your work.

Via The Art of Work:

“The basic idea of a portfolio life is that instead of thinking of your work as a monolithic activity, what if you chose to see it as the complex group of interests, passions, and activities it is? And what if instead of identifying with a job description, you began to see the whole mass of things you do as one portfolio of activity?
This idea was first coined by Charles Handy in his book The Age of Unreason. In the book, Handy lays out five different types of work that make up your portfolio. They are: fee work, salary work, homework, study work, and gift work.”

8. Mastery Helps Us Realize Our Potential

Work is the ultimate dojo for our self-actualization in the real-world.

When we answer to our calling, and truly pursuit what we are capable of, we start to realize our true potential.

Via The Art of Work:

“Mastery isn’t about straight As or the highest salary in the company. It’s not even about being the most popular in your field.
It’s about understanding your potential and then dedicating your life to pursuing that ideal. It means doing your absolute best. Why? Because the craft deserves it, because the calling requires it, and because maybe you’ll be a better person for it. After all, this is the role of work in our lives—not only as a means to make a living, but as a tool to make us into who we were born to be.”

9. Think About Work in Terms of the Work Done

What if work was something that you did for free, and it was the very thing that inspired you to jump out of bed in the morning?

If the only reason you do your work is to get paid, you’re missing the chance to master your craft, and become something more than you are today.

Via The Art of Work:

“’The habit of thinking about work as something one does to make money is so ingrained in us,’ she wrote, “that we can scarcely imagine what a revolutionary change it would be to think about it instead in terms of the work done.” If we could make this change and think of work the same way we think of play, treating it as something we do for pleasure, it could change the world.
In essence, Sayers was saying that the same attitude we have toward the pursuits we enjoy doing, we should have toward work, going on to say that work is not a means to an end. It is the end.”

10. Work is a Means of Making a Difference

Work is a meaningful way to transcend simple existence and making a living.

It’s a way to make a difference.

Your difference.

Via The Art of Work:

“A few years later, I had a similar experience, having raised enough money through my blog to help build an income-generating workshop for women living in a leper camp just outside of Mombasa, Kenya. Work, it seems, was never meant to be something we do just to make a living. It was meant to be a means of making a difference—in our own lives and in the lives of others. The problem today is that many of us see our jobs just as a duty, something we’re obligated to do to pay the bills. Or we see it as a means of
improving our lives, of making so much money we can buy all the things we’ve ever wanted. But neither option will satisfy.”

Bonus Idea:  There is More Life In You Yet to Be Lived

More than just a bonus, this might just be the most important idea in the book.

You have a choice.

You can choose to become all that you’re capable of, or you can live in the shadow wondering what might have been.

And the best news is that there is always more life in you waiting to be lived.

Via The Art of Work:

“Ancient myths and legends speak to this. Every hero’s journey included some sacred task that culminated in a deeper understanding of who they were born to be. And how was this done? Through a personal quest—some great feat that required every talent, skill, and strength they could muster. In other words, they had to work.
Every day you and I face a choice: to either pursue our authentic selves or a shadow of the real thing. We either do what is expected of us, or we listen to that voice of intuition deep inside promising something more significant. And as we pick up our hammers and scalpels, as we sit down in front of our laptops or climb onboard the bus for another tour, as we endeavor to do meaningful work in the world, we are becoming ourselves.”

Fulfillment is for Everyone

The day, or more precisely, the moment that you decide to embark on your journey or your personal quest, is the moment that you start living and leading your path of fulfillment.

Fulfillment is not a destination, it’s a way of life and it’s accessible to us all.

Via The Art of Work:

“Fulfillment isn’t just for the elite few who find a purpose for life; it’s for everyone. And that potential exists in each and every one of us. You have everything you need to be your whole self; it’s already in you. Now you just have to become it”

If you are not living and breathing what you were born to do and doing the work that makes you come alive, then you know what to do.

The question is, will you do it?

You Might Also Like

3 Great Metaphors for Work and Life

101 of the Greatest Insights and Actions for Work and Life

Be a Craftsmen

Don’t Let Work Turn You Into Who You Don’t Want to Be

Work as Self-Expression Quotes

The post 10 Big Ideas from The Art of Work appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
0
JD <![CDATA[Storytelling is a Basic Skill for Success]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26211 2015-04-08T17:20:41Z 2015-04-08T17:10:56Z Storytelling is a basic skill for success. Master storytelling to influence people and drive more meaningful change.

The post Storytelling is a Basic Skill for Success appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
image

“Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.”  — Robert McKee

Facts don’t engage and captivate people.

Stories do.

Storytelling is a basic skill for success.

If you master the art of storytelling, you can win friends, influence people, and improve your outlook on life.

Yeah, storytelling is that powerful.

In the book, What More Can I Say?, Dianna Booher shows us how to master storytelling to influence people and drive more meaningful change.

Stories Drive Points Deeper Into Our Psyche

Stories communicate in a deeper way beyond facts and figures.

Via What More Can I Say?:

“We share our stories with our friends, family, and strangers on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.  We talk about vacations, holiday get-togethers, office projects, and travel mishaps.  We don’t dump statistics on our social media sites; our stories carry emotion.  They drive a point deeper and deeper into our psyche.”

Stories are a Natural Form of Communication

We are natural born storytellers.

Via What More Can I Say?:

“We tell ourselves stories about why we do what we do … about why we act the way we act … about what we said and why we said it … about how something should be done or not done.  The stories that on in our head prove positively that stories are a natural mode of communication.”

The Media Uses Stories to Influence Us All the Time

The media knows better than to just dump a bunch of facts on us.  The media connects with us through stories of real people.

Via What More Can I Say?:

“When tragedy strikes, the media doesn’t just report how many people died, the impact on the Richter scale or the economy, and the inches of snow, rain, or flooding.  Instead, reporters find the people stories.  They put a face on the tragedy by telling you of the single guy who jumped from the safety of his boat to save a drowning two-year old whose parents, unable to swim, stood on the swollen river’s shore, screaming for help.”

Even Judges and Seasoned Attorneys Prefer Stories

If you thought that judges and lawyers want just the facts, think again.

Via What More Can I Say?:

“Researchers have discovered that even judges and seasoned attorneys prefer story briefs to logo briefs (those built totally on logical argument).  An empirical study on the power of story determined that stories are persuasive to experienced lawyers and judges because they evoke emotional responses that make the legal claims of the parties more credible and elicit empathy in their judicial thinking.

Structure is to storytelling what framing is to a house.  Without it, you just have  a heap of supplies on a vacant lot.”

A Story Has a Hero, a Struggle, and a Goal

If there isn’t a struggle, there isn’t a story.   The heart of a story is the challenge and the change.

Via What More Can I Say?:

“Think back to your high-school or college English classes.  Your professor defined a story this way: ‘A hero struggles to overcome obstacles to reach an important goal.’ “

Tips to Build Your Personal or Business Stories

Booher shares a pragmatic and powerful set of tips to keep in mind as you start to build your personal or business stories.

Via What More Can I Say?

  • Show, don’t’ tell.  That is , don’t’ tell your audience about the movie.  Put them in the movie theater, and let them see the movie.  Re-create the scenes.
  • Start with a hero.  Anything or anyone can be a hero in the story: your organization, a product, a location, your client, a passerby.
  • Don’t always try to be the hero or heroine in your own stories.
  • Give your hero a goal or challenge to overcome.
  • Add struggles.  The hero must overcome struggles or obstacles to master the challenge or meet the goal.
  • Use dialogue.  Let listeners hear the characters talk to one another.
  • End with the resolution that motivates your listeners to action.
  • Make sure your listeners can identity with the hero.
  • Be interactive in the telling.
  • Use analogies, metaphors, and props in the telling.
  • Be vulnerable.  Don’t always tell about your successes.  Audiences relate more often and learn more from ‘failure’ stories.
  • Add humor–self-effacing humor is best.
  • Create  callback line.  Is there a line from your story that you can refer to later to bring to mind again and again for  your listeners–a reference phrase that will continue to drive home your point?

Your ability to tell stories will help you leapfrog over those with just the facts.

Wrap the challenge and the change in a story that sticks.

You Might Also Like

3 Stories Leaders Need to Tell

9 Laws of Effective Communication Skills

Master Your Emotions by Mastering Your Stories

Personal Stories Bring Ideas to Life

Strategic Stories

Image by Moazzam Brohi.

The post Storytelling is a Basic Skill for Success appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
0
JD <![CDATA[Personal Stories Bring Ideas to Life]]> http://sourcesofinsight.com/?p=26171 2015-04-06T17:04:27Z 2015-04-06T16:24:36Z Personal stories bring ideas to life. Personal stories reveal your values, beliefs and ideas, and you communicate your character.

The post Personal Stories Bring Ideas to Life appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
image

“We’re all stories, in the end.” — Steven Moffat

Stories bring ideas to life.

You can use personal stories to inspire others with meaningful messages and actionable insights.

When you share personal stories, you connect with others in a very human way.

You reveal your values, beliefs and ideas, and you communicate your character.

In the book, Anticipate: The Art of Leading by Looking Ahead, Rob-Jan De Jong shows us how we can transform our stories from the conceptual to the inspired and actionable.

Stories are Data with a Soul

Without the story, it’s just data.  A story gives the data meaning.   A story helps us relate in a deeper way.

Via Anticipate: The Art of Leading by Looking Ahead:

“So how do you use the art of storytelling to make your personal character, authenticity, and values come to life?  Brene Brown, a research professor at the University of Houston, says, ‘Stories are data with a soul.  Data wrapped in stories have the ability to move people, to inspire people to take action.’”

Personal Stories Reveal Values, Beliefs and Ideas

When you share a personal story, you reveal important things about you.   You help others see your values, beliefs, and ideas in context.

Via Anticipate: The Art of Leading by Looking Ahead:

“For your visionary communication to become authentic, you need to integrate a special type of story–the personal anecdote.  We all have anecdotes about moments in our lives that gave us wisdom and personal lessons that we still remember and apply today.  These experiences often provide anecdotal evidence of why we think and behave in certain ways–they reveal the values, beliefs, and ideas that we care deeply about.”

Personal Stories Communicate Character

When you tell personal stories, you communicate your character through the challenges you face, and the choices you make.

Via Anticipate: The Art of Leading by Looking Ahead:

“Your personal anecdotes are much more than just insightful recollections; they communicate something about your character.  In other words, they provide your story with a soul.  Sharing a meaningful personal anecdotes shifts your rhetoric from the head to the heart.  After all, the story stayed with you for a good reason: You experienced it and attached significance to it.  And when you share it, you’ll relive the emotions and show what you truly care about.  This kind of honesty automatically makes you and your story truly authentic.”

Draw from Your Database of Life Lessons

You can share personal stories of memorable and meaningful moments from your database of life lessons.  Rather than sterile advice, you can share personal stories that bring your valuable lessons to life.

Via Anticipate: The Art of Leading by Looking Ahead:

“I encourage you to dig into your personal database of life lessons.  Seek out these memorable, meaningful moments and experiences; they taught you something important that still resonates with your today.  Maybe it was a comment from a parent at a point in your life when you were stuck between a rock and a hard place.  Or maybe it was something you did that failed miserably.  Or a worry that turned out to be unfounded and taught you not to let your fears hold you back.  Or maybe even something one of your kids said to you recently.

Try to discover why you remember the story–what is the real meaning of this experience to you?  Be honest and authentic.  And don’t ignore your database of mistakes: What were your expectations, what went wrong and why, and what did you take away from it?”

Empathy is Accessible to All of Us

According to Sue Monk Kidd, we all have access to empathy:

“Empathy is the most mysterious transaction that the human soul can have, and it’s accessible to all of us, but we have to give ourselves the opportunity to identify, to plunge ourselves in a story where we see the world from the bottom up or through another’s eyes or heart.”

Stories Offer Living Proof

According to John Capecci and Timothy Cage, stories offer living proof of our messages.  It’s how we “Be the message.”

Via Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference:

“The enormity of problems like hunger and social injustice can certainly motivate us to act. We can be convinced logically of the need for intervention and change. But it is the story of one individual that ultimately makes the difference—by offering living proof.”

We are Natural Born Storytellers

According to John Capecci and Timothy Cage, we are all natural-born storytellers.  Our personal stories help us make meaning of the events in our life.

Via Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference:

“The ability to see our lives as stories and share those stories with others is at the core of what it means to be human. We use stories to order and make sense of our lives, to define who we are, even to construct our realities: this happened, then this happened, then this. I was, I am, I will be. We recount our dreams, narrate our days and organize our memories into stories we tell others and ourselves. As natural-born storytellers, we respond to others’ stories because they are deeply, intimately familiar.”

Storytelling is one of your greatest gifts.

It’s already inside you.

Share your stories and inspire more people in more meaningful ways.

You Might Also Like

3 Stories Leaders Need to Tell

Master Your Emotions by Mastering Your Stories

My Story of Personal Transformation

Strategic Stories

Stories that Move Mountains

Image by Blondinrikard Fröberg.

The post Personal Stories Bring Ideas to Life appeared first on Sources of Insight.

]]>
2